When Wood Sings

When Wood Sings

Article by Ethan Cutler; photos by Caroline Li

Juan Mijares is not in it for the money. Granted, most people looking to make money don’t go into the violin-making business in the first place. But even within the profession, there are those who maximize their profit by churning out instruments as often as possible, and then there are violin-makers like Juan—those who earn the noble title of “luthier.”

The Diversity Myth

The Diversity Myth

Article by Drew Turley; art by Hannah Seabright

Major efforts to diversify CC as an institution started after Tiefenthaler joined us in 2011. After she heard the cry for more diversity, she started making changes. On the Diversity page of CC’s website, we report that in 2004, 14.3 percent of students identified as American ethnic minorities. In 2014, 24.7 percent of students identified as American ethnic minorities. In 2004, 1.7 percent of students were international. And again that figure rose to 6.4 percent in 2014. While these changes indicate institutional efforts to diversify CC, we certainly have plenty of room to grow. We are still an overwhelmingly white institution.

Dumb Idea:

Dumb Idea:

Article by Jackson Truesdale

I had to—wanted to—write an article. If I was to write, I wanted to go full-hog, chasing interviews and information. The first idea: Why is Colorado College expanding? CC is building out into the surrounding neighborhood. I could interview students, administrators, faculty and campus-neighboring residents. It would be great. But I also felt like turning inward, looking at CC and how the institution affects our lives as students. I would try to learn how the CC admission process affects socioeconomic diversity in the student body. Students informally commented on the admission process, on the odious “Admissions,” with general distrust and dissatisfaction. “CC sucks. They’re up to no good.”

Moanin'

Moanin'

Article by Abe Mamet; art by Alayna Altman

When I was nine, my eyes opened. Or rather, my iPod’s pre-set alarm clock woke me up from a bad nap. Just in time for dinner, yet my thoughts were ripped quickly and terrifyingly from my rumbling stomach as I realized I’d mistakenly queued my brother’s jazz playlist as my alarm instead of my AC/DC collection. What woke me, then, was not Bon Scott’s wailing on “Highway to Hell,” but the hellfire and brimstone erupting from a foreign baritone sax opening Charles Mingus’s “Moanin’.” Soon, more than my eyes opened. I realized that the music flooding my tiny closet of a room was different than any other music I’d ever heard. This song, I quickly realized, was Mingus’s tribute to freedom, and class was in session.

Unearthed

Unearthed

Article by Maggie O’Brien; photos courtesy of CC Special Collections

“Colorado College does have some skeletons in its closets,” begins former Colorado College Professor of History, Anne Hyde, in her 2005 article published in the Southwest Studies newsletter la Tertulia. “And like many other institutions in the United States, some of its skeletons were the remains of Native American people.” 

Your Friendly Neighborhood Sasquatch

Your Friendly Neighborhood Sasquatch

Article by Rebecca Twinney; art by Caroline Li and Jackson Truesdale

About two miles into the drive up Pikes Peak, there’s an official-looking brown highway sign alerting drivers to the crossing of a looming, hulk-like figure. With legs as thick as its waist and feet larger than its head, it’s unmistakably the infamous Bigfoot.

Underneath the figure reads, “Due to sightings in the area of a creature resembling ‘big foot,’ this sign has been posted for your safety.” 

Getting What I Want

Getting What I Want

Article by Anonymous; art by Isabel Auricho

Came to college a virgin. I didn’t stay that way for long. I started dating someone at the end of September, and we broke up when I went abroad junior year. Then I was in another relationship until this past February. I’ve essentially never been single in college. I’d never experienced “the hookup culture.” And now that I have, in this last semester at school, it’s easy to see why so many people hate it.

Prying Eyes

In 1964, Martin Luther King Jr. received an anonymous letter which began: “In view of your low-grade, abnormal personal behavior I will not dignify your name with either a Mr. or a Reverend or a Dr. And your last name calls to mind only the type of King such as King Henry the VIII and his countless acts of adultery and immoral conduct lower than that of a beast.” The letter was written by the first director of the FBI, J. Edgar Hoover.

Switchbacks

Switchbacks

In the rearview mirror, I saw blood spreading across the white of my left eye. A pretty scarlet—by now I was screaming, yelping maybe. And the pain was increasing. We were 8,000 feet above sea level, and as we gained elevation the pressure inside my terribly blocked sinuses increased as the atmospheric pressure decreased. In my panicking mind, there were two foreseeable outcomes: pressurized air would burst from my eye sockets in a spray of red goo, blinding me forever, or my skull would shatter.

Searching for Smoke

Searching for Smoke

I am a pudgy guy. It would be hard to picture me hiking up the side of a mountain in snow pants and a jacket, my inhaler safely in my pocket. But there I was, on a two-mile trek with an elevation gain of 2,000 vertical feet ascending Squaw Mountain, in Idaho Springs, Colorado, with a ranger from the Clear Creek district. Our destination was the Squaw Fire Lookout, a place I’d wanted to visit since I first discovered that these towers existed.

A Portrait for Palmer

A Portrait for Palmer

Even an unmoving edifice like Palmer Hall can be pulled into a new drama by someone else’s invention. Lukey Walden’s (‘17) Studio Art thesis show, “They! Them!! Here!!!” used the second floor landing and second floor of Palmer to display portraits they’d painted of transgender, queer and gender non-conforming individuals from the CC and Colorado Springs community. The title of each painting is the subject’s name, and a note reminds viewers to refer to each subject with “they” pronouns.